Ambient Air Pollution and Fetal Growth Restriction: Physician Diagnosis of Fetal Growth Restriction Versus Population-Based Small-for-Gestational Age

Publication Type
Journal Article
Year of Publication
2019
Authors
Nobles, CJ; Grantz, KL; Liu, D; Williams, A; Ouidir, M; Seeni, I; Sherman, S; Mendola, P
Secondary
Sci Total Environ
Volume
650
Start Page
2641
Pagination
2641-2647
Date Published
02/2019
Keywords
Ambient air pollution; Fetal growth restriction; Small-for-gestational age
Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Ambient air pollution may affect fetal growth restriction (FGR) through several mechanisms. However, prior studies of air pollution and small-for-gestational age (SGA), a common proxy for FGR, have reported inconsistent findings.

OBJECTIVE:

We assessed air pollution in relation to physician-diagnosed FGR and population-based SGA in the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Consecutive Pregnancy Study (2002-2010).

Mp>METHODS:

Among 50,005 women (112,203 singleton births), FGR was captured from medical records and ICD-9 codes, and SGA determined by population standards for birthweight <10th, <5th and <3rd percentile. Community Multiscale Air Quality models estimated ambient levels of seven criteria pollutants for whole pregnancy, 3-months preconception, and 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimesters. Generalized estimating equations with robust standard errors accounted for interdependency of pregnancies within participant. Models adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, smoking, alcohol, parity, insurance, marital status, asthma and temperature.

RESULTS:

FGR was diagnosed in 1.5% of infants, and 6.7% were <10th, 2.7% <5th and 1.5% <3rd percentile for SGA. Positive associations of SO2, NO2 and PM10 and negative associations of O3 with FGR were observed throughout preconception and pregnancy. For example, an interquartile increase in whole pregnancy SO2 was associated with 16% (95% CI 8%, 25%) increased FGR risk, 17% for NO2 (95% CI 9%, 26%) and 12% for PM10 (95% CI 6%, 19%). Associations with SGA were less clear.

CONCLUSIONS:

Chronic exposure to air pollution may be associated with FGR but not SGA in this low-risk population.